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European Union Restricts Mercury Fillings, Not So in US

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European Union flag

Credit: Yanni Koutsomitis, flickr.com
CC BY 2.0

by Dr. Joseph Mercola, Mercola.com

“The next generation of Europe’s children are safe from toxic dental mercury,” proclaims Charlie Brown, president of Consumers for Dental Choice and the umbrella World Alliance for Mercury-Free Dentistry.

Starting July 1, 2018, amalgam use is banned for children under the age of 15 and for pregnant or nursing women — anywhere in the vast European Union (EU)1,2 — 28 countries in all, with a population totaling more than half a billion people.

“This landmark achievement still has to be officially ratified,” Charlie says, “but all three European Union institutions, the [European] commission, the Council [of the European Union] and the European Parliament have reached consensus.”
“The ban on amalgam for children in Europe, we promise you, will reverberate in favor of the children across the world — in America North and South, in Africa, and in Asia and the Pacific,” said Brown.
“The game changer that will do in amalgam is the Minamata Convention on Mercury, which requires every participating nation to act to reduce amalgam use. The Convention is expected to become legally binding in the middle of 2017.”

The hard-fought victory in Europe came after six grueling years of reports, hearings before the Commission, meetings at the Parliament, events in the national capital cities and in the E.U. capital city of Brussels and submission of testimony to a seemingly unending number of players.

Civil society — the public — mobilized at a level rarely seen on an issue so intertwined between environment and health concerns.

In an internet vote called by the European Commission, 88 percent of the public voted for a phase-out of amalgam as opposed to only 12 percent to keep amalgam — and voter turnout was double that of any other Minamata issue.

European-wide nonprofit groups brought their networks to the forefront, and were joined by nation-based environmental and patient rights’ groups from France, Germany, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Sweden, Denmark, the United Kingdom, Portugal, Spain and Italy.

At the outset of the campaign in 2010, every major EU institution supported amalgam. At the end, in 2016, no major EU institution did.

More …

© 2016 Dr. Joseph Mercola

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